Friday, 13 April 2012

In Lak’ech

In Lak’ech (I Am You or You Are Me)

Tú eres mi otro yo.
You are my other me.
Si te hago daño a ti.
If I do harm to you.
Me hago daño a mí mismo.
I do harm to myself.
Si te amo y respeto,
If I love and respect you,
Me amo y respeto yo.
I love and respect myself.

Luis Valdez

In Lak'ech Banned Poetry: first of six short films
 Video Stream: National Teach-In with Mexican American Studies

Text of poem found here: Rethinking Schools: Outlawing Solidarity in Tucson ~

"Its ethos of love, mutual respect, and solidarity is expressed in the poem that has come to symbolize the program, borrowed from
Luis Valdez’ 1971 Mayan-inspired “Pensamiento Serpentino”


Published on Apr 4, 2012 by
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/precious-knowledge/

Premiering May 17, 2012. Check local listings:
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/broadcast.html


First clip: In 1997, community activism led the Tucson city council to set up a study committee to look at ways of boosting Latino student achievement and reducing dropout rates. Based on its findings, the school board unanimously voted to create what would become the Mexican American Studies Program.

Second clip: As teachers in Tucson's Mexican American Studies Program, teachers Curtis Acosta and Jose Gonzalez successfully engaged students in the classroom, helping to close the achievement gap between white students and students of color. However, a group of lawmakers and politicians saw thing differently, and launched a campaign to end the program.

Third vid: In this excerpt from the Independent Lens documentary, Precious Knowledge, Arizona State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tom Horne, holds a press conference calling for the end of the Mexican American Studies Program. He believes ethnic studies emphasize ethnic solidarity, rather than assimilation with American ideas, and should be abolished.

Fourth vid: Tucson ethnic studies student, Mariah Harvey, describes how Mexican American Studies classes at Tucson High School enriched both her understanding of racial difference in her community as well as her own sense of self-identity as a biracial LGBT teen in this companion video the Independent Lens documentary, Precious Knowledge.

Fifth vid: Nacho Vejar, an ethnic studies student in a Tucson high school, describes how Mexican American Studies classes encourage critical thinking, community involvement, and the pursuit of new talents in this companion video the Independent Lens documentary, Precious Knowledge.

About the Film

When a highly successful Mexican American Studies program at a high school in Tucson comes under fire for teaching ethnic chauvinism, teachers and students fight back. This modern civil rights struggle is born at the epicenter of the immigration debate in the age of identity politics.

Learn more about "Independent Lens":
http://www.pbs.org/independentlens

Watch "Independent Lens" films online:
http://video.pbs.org/program/1218239994/



Sources
http://www.preciousknowledgefilm.com/teach/index.php
http://rethinkingschoolsblog.wordpress.com/2012/02/23/outlawing-solidarity-in-tucson/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Luis_Valdez
Videos + notes from http://www.youtube.com/user/IndependentLens/videos?query=Precious+Knowledge

No comments: